A Short Tribute

A Short Tribute

Hacham Ben Zion Nissim Pardess, was born to Sarah-Markada, daughter of Hacham Vidal Cuenca, and Hacham Eliyahu Pardess on 27 Kislev 5622 (1862) in Jerusalem. He learned Torah from his father and other Jerusalem, eventually joining Beit El kabbalist yeshiva’s sages, as had his father.

Hacham Ben Zion Nissim Pardess was sent as a rabbinic emissary to the Jewish communities of the Maghreb. When he returned to Jerusalem, he served as rabbi of the Istanbulis synagogue in Jerusalem's Old City and headed its yeshiva; he also officiated at the Nachlaot neighborhood's Taranto synagogue. His sermons were highly appreciated by the public and he was adored everywhere; he had a pleasant voice and was a paytan who composed piyutim on Israel's redemption.

Hacham Ben Zion Nissim Pardess married Mazal Oro, Hacham Abraham Cassuto's daughter, and they had three daughters and a son. His son, Hacham Eliyahu Pardess, was eventually appointed Chief Rabbi of Jerusalem. During his later years, Hacham Ben Zion Pardess was part of the Magen David group of sages that studied at the Mercaz HaRav yeshiva in Jerusalem. In keeping with the kabbalist custom, he left a detailed will that dealt mainly with his burial and memorial ceremony.

Hacham Ben Zion Nissim Pardess passed away on 1 Adar Aleph, 5703 (1943) and was buried in Jerusalem. His book, Pardess HaTorah, was written in two volumes and includes sermons on the Torah, Jewish festivals, on the books Ecclesiastes, Proverbs and Psalms and more.

 

Torah Study
A few quotes from the Rabbi on 'Torah Study'
Love of Israel
A few quotes from the Rabbi on 'Love of Israel'
Tzedakah and Healing
A few quotes from the Rabbi on 'Tzedakah and Healing'
Redemption of Israel
A few quotes from the Rabbi on 'Redemption of Israel'
in which he recounts the story of a haughty person whose pride hindered the redemption
It says in the Talmud, "the Messiah will not come until the peruta [penny] will cease from the purse". It also says there that "The son of David will not come until the arrogant will cease to exist from among [the People of] Israel". I once heard a reason for the contiguity of the two sayings told as a witticism. There once was a pauper from a good family, who was glad of his poverty for the reason that "the Messiah will not come until the peruta will cease from the purse", who met up with a haughty individual, whom he greeted and who did not greet him in return. He was very sad making his way home. When asked why he seemed sadder than usual, he replied that until now he had been glad of his poverty, because "the Messiah will not come until the peruta will cease from the purse", and his monies had indeed ceased, so that he was certain that this would privilege him to bringing the Redeemer to [the People of] Israel. However, he had now encountered this haughty person and, since "The son of David will not come until the arrogant will cease to exist from among [the People of] Israel", this certainly warranted his sadness, seeing as his pride hinders the redemption of Israel.
Pardess HaTorah, Sermons on the Torah, p. 12, HaKtav Institute Publishing, Jerusalem, 1998
Traditions of the Fathers
A few quotes from the Rabbi on 'Traditions of the Fathers'
Customs of Israel
A few quotes from the Rabbi on 'Customs of Israel'